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How convenient! Just imagine…no more tedium of writing a resume…worrying about embedding the right key words…

29789907_10214018648752915_2617038078748144260_n Gautham Iyengar in Friends For us

 

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We need to define both holistic and design first. To design is to thinkDesign is the ability to be able to broaden our perception of the world around, to see the unseen, and make it appear as a new purposeful addition to the real world.

Holistic design is to see and think of the world in two broad dimensions – as interconnectedand evolving systems. Holistic design is formed by and leads to interconnected systems. Evolving nature of holistic design is when the design leads to the evolution of the interconnected systems.

A good example of holistic design is the design of fire for it’s one of the oldest designs we can trace back to. Designed over 2 million years ago, fire was supposedly discovered by rubbing two stones over a heap of dry leaves. Never did the world perceive a connection between dried leaves and stones before the design of fire.

The design of fire led to the evolution of the human race from Homo Erectus to Homo Sapiens as it led to the design of cooking and much more.

 

– Karthik Vijayakumar, Founder and Principal, DYT Studios & Host of The Design Your Thinking Podcast

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Source: theblog.adobe.com/ask-an-uxpert-what-does-holistic-ux-design-mean-to-you/

 

Design Thought

 

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words matter more than you would know, says Jack Dean – he should know from his extensive experience over the years, sitting on both sides of the table.

NightingaleCXO

Though he talks about B2B marketers, obviously it applies to other segments too. Excerpts from his article appearing here:

Have you ever noticed that the words and phrases used by CXO Buyers are somehow different? Their language is different. Their conversations are different. More formal, more direct, more reserved.

I don’t have studies or survey data to support what I’m about to say, but I know with certainty, having been a CXO Buyer influenced by them, that WORDS MATTER. When I was sitting on the other side of the desk as a CXO Buyer (and now during role play conversations in sales training workshops), I used the word choices of B2B marketers as a reliable predictor of their character and professionalism.

Of course, there are other aspects of personal character that are continuously being observed by CXO Buyers (e.g. like how you are dressed, how you treat your colleagues, what you say about your competition, how you control your emotions), but your word choices are, in my opinion, the most important predictor of character and professionalism…

If you believe that you have good-to-great “business-appropriate” language skills, recognize that that capability is a potential competitive selling advantage. My best recommendation is to actively seek out opportunities to CONVERSE with customers, especially CXO Buyers. Phone calls are better than emails. Face-to-face conversations are better than PowerPoint PDFs.

You get the idea … “professionally” flaunt your communication capabilities in order to differentiate from your B2B marketing peers.

My advice is simply an extension of the quote, “Deal with the world the way it is, not the way you wish it to be”. Use your business language skills to your advantage.

 

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Source: Image from aircomfortchairs.com

 

…where to spend the bucks!

A lightly edited excerpt from an article by Josh Elman appearing here. Though dated, the anecdote and the concept are still relevant, I thought. And for companies not merely in the product space. Here we go:

twitter-bird-white-on-blue

Pretty much every new app has the following problem: lots of people sign up but don’t stick around.

I frequently get asked what are benchmarks for retention after one day or one week. My answer tends to be the same for products in the early days:

Ignore the benchmarks. Find the patterns in the stories of people who do get your product. Figure out what converted them and got them so excited to keep using your product every day or every week. In the early days, your main focus should be to attract and create more and more of those “core users” who deeply use your product. Over time you can try to increase averages, but first, you just need a core and strong base.

Most people look too much at the “big data” and try to draw conclusions. In the early days of a product you have to talk to people. You need anecdotes much more than data. You could say The plural of anecdote is data.

To collect anecdotes, you have to talk to actual users. The best users to call are ones who can help you understand why they tried your product and what hooked them. I like to look for bouncebacks. Bouncebacks are users that have tried your product, bailed immediately and didn’t find it useful, came back to try again for some reason (at least 1 week later, or even better, 1 month later), and then got hooked.

The first step is to identify some bounceback users to call…

From these patterns, you can invest in revising your marketing and improving your product and onboarding. Revamp your messaging to focus more on the messages that brought people back and got them engaged. Update your product and onboarding to simplify whatever the users did the second time to get fully engaged…

We learned from early users that many of them signed up for Twitter and thought it was just a megaphone. When they had nothing to say, and didn’t otherwise understand the product they bailed. When they later heard about how valuable Twitter could be if they followed their reverend or the food truck that broadcasts its location every day, they came back and tried again. But this second time they specifically sought out people to follow and had a good experience. We rapidly rebuilt our onboarding to focus much more on following and finding the right people which caused significant increases in how many users were activated after signing up. We revised our messaging to talk much more about finding and following the right people on Twitter instead of talking about tweeting and broadcasting.

I recommend doing this exercise of interviewing new bounceback users every 6 months. You’ll learn a lot about how to keep improving your adoption and activation.

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Source: Image from publiclibrariesonline.org

tears

I once read a story about a kid R who loved to write fiction. In his home lived a kid P staying with her mother employed in that home as a household help.

R once received an email from his uncle praising him for latest piece. The excited kid read out the email to P, “My uncle quite liked my story. He wrote ‘Bravo!'”

P: “Well, of course if he liked it, must be a good one. What’s the story about?”

R: “It’s about a man who finds a magic cup. Soon he learns if he weeps into the cup, his tears would turn to pearls….And at the end of story, he’s sitting on a mountain of pearls with a blood stained knife in his hands and his dead wife by his side. ”

P: “So he killed her so that he could cry more and get rich?”

R: “Yes, you’re very quick”

P: “But why couldn’t he just smell and cut some onions?”

 

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Source: quora.com/profile/Bhaskar-Dutta-15, image from independent.co.uk

An opportunity seen in an adverse situation to win customer heart-share! Kit-Kat-kitkat-26578047-800-500

 JWT Brazil created an airport vending machine at Sao Paulo airport that handed out free Kit Kat’s – but only to those with delayed flights. The machine scans their boarding passes, then recognizes if their flight is on the delayed list and delivers the candy bar.

It’s a great creative use of data and frankly, anything that brings a smile to the face of delayed passengers is bound to be a winner. Now, if only airlines could learn from this approach.

See a short clip here.

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Source: creativity-online.com, adsoftheworld.com and fanpop.com