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Hate Selling

Tom Fisfburne, a career marketer, a coach and a consultant has a lot of interesting things to say on his subject. Excerpted from his blog post here.

hate-selling

Rafat Ali of Skift described how travel brands market to customers as “hate-selling”:

“Delta’s lowest fare seats comes with tons of restrictions, and its ecommerce team thought it would be a great idea to hate-sell it,  implying: “Here’s is what you don’t get, you cheap shit!” Passive-aggressive selling at its best. Or worst.”

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The post attracted an interesting comment from a reader seeing nothing wrong though…:

Steve Willson says

I’m actually pleased to see that Delta is explicitly laying out what you DON’T get if you book their lowest price fares. We so often see news reports and travel site posts after the fact with folks complaining that they didn’t know that they might not get seated with their companion, or that they didn’t get a meal. Those of us who travel a lot understand the lunacy of “modern” air travel, but those who are infrequent travellers may still be stuck in the romantic era. So maybe we just need to frame the conversation a bit differently…

“At Delta we look forward to having you onboard, but here are a few reminders before you complete your ticket purchase…”

Maybe I’m jaded, but I go for transparency whenever possible:)

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Via: Skip Prichard’s (a coach, a trainer, a consultant…) blog here. Text in italics is added.

 

Watch out, rules are changing! Read till the end.

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Thoughts On Design

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How To Sell The Future?

A tip from Seth Godin:

It’s almost impossible to sell the future

If you’re trying to persuade someone to make an investment, buy some insurance or support a new plan, please consider that human beings are terrible at buying these things.

What we’re good at is ‘now.’

Right now.

When we buy a stake in the future, what we’re actually buying is how it makes us feel today.

We move up all the imagined benefits and costs of something in the future and experience them now. That’s why it’s hard to stick to a diet (because celery tastes bad today, and we can’t easily experience feeling healthy in ten years). That’s why we make such dumb financial decisions (because it’s so tempting to believe magical stories about tomorrow).

If you want people to be smarter or more active or more generous about their future, you’ll need to figure out how to make the transaction about how it feels right now.

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Thoughts On Design

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Source: medium.freecodecamp.com/nobody-wants-to-use-software-a75643bee654