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Archive for the ‘Engineering’ Category

“…that pernicious nonsense about being a leader and not a manager. Your challenge is to help the team and team members succeed. The only way to succeed at that is to do all three kinds of work. Lead. Manage. Supervise. Do them all well. “

Read this short post from Wally Bock to know what each entails.

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They all have small feet!

How else could they get into other people’s shoes 🙂

In his article ‘Empathy Is The Key To Innovation’ Baruch Sachs assertively identifies a key ingredient for innovation:

“…Every great innovation has come from a place of empathy. This makes great sense because innovation is so often borne out of someone’s frustration with the current way or state of things. For example, Steve Jobs was frustrated that he could not carry his library of music around in his pocket. He thought others might share his frustration. His answer? The iPod.

Ride-sharing services were borne out of people’s frustration with the overall taxi experience. All of the innovations that Uber, Lyft, and others have created through their technology and services have come from a place of empathy. These are just two examples showing how empathy has driven tremendous innovations that have shaped the lives of millions of people…”

And yet “… Empathy is the single most-overlooked ingredient of innovation. This is a huge problem because empathy is a critical ingredient of ensuring successful innovation…”

Design thinking and other methodologies by themselves will not take the org far in innovation in absence of empathy.

So you know now who is the most likely to drive innovation in your org.

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Image from cio.com

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“Good service design is important for the overall user experience. Yet, it is even more important at the end of an experience (or exposure to a brand) due to the Peak-End Rule and Recency Effect. Placing the business needs before the user’s needs, breaking the user’s flow and not addressing a user’s need at the point of their need are primary culprits in designing a poor experience.”

Chris Kiess writes in his article “Service Design — How to Fail at the Checkout and Ruin Your User’s End Experience” appearing here.

While he talks about “8 ways I see retail merchants like Target, Walmart or Meijer fail in service design as it relates to the end of the customer experience and the final impression they make with consumers,” there’s an interesting snippet about a negative perception and how it could be turned around.

First about the perception:

“The biggest faux pas of superstores is having too many checkout registers and not enough cashiers. Most people would probably not be concerned during the holidays (or any other time) if they sauntered over to the checkout and there were ten cashiers at all ten registers with lines behind each. This would give the customer the illusion the store is busy and they are doing everything they can to help customers move through the checkout process. But, what generally happens instead is you walk up to the checkout area after finding everything you need and there are thirty registers with only five in service. This, I cannot understand. On the surface, it gives the impression the store could do more. After all, there are twenty-five more registers and surely they could open one or two more of them. It boggles the mind that a store would feel the need to install thirty checkout lanes and never use them all at one time.”

He suggests:

“This is largely about human perception. The simple fix is to cut the number of registers installed and use a greater percentage of them during busy times. This would give the impression (and shape perceptions) a greater effort is being employed to move people through the lines.”

A thought:

The suggestion could still leave at times a few unattended counters. So why not have counters that could be rolled in from back of the store on need basis and wheeled away when done? Just as many as needed, leaving no visibly unattended counters at any time.

Also could the stores do like the airlines doing in-line check-in with staff going around with their special devices? Of course, it needs some adaption to allow for handling the purchases in the cart.

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Image from here.

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Vide விஷ்வாமித்திரர்

Drawing water using manual pumps (If the clip doesn’t show, go here):

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If Indian Railways can pull this off…

  • An government organization, pan-India, managing a mind-boggling 67 K+ route-miles over 144 K+ bridges, with 7300+ stations and a rolling stock of 11 K+ locos, 64 K+ passenger carriages and 277 K freight cars/wagons, not mentioning workshops, repair sheds…
  • With a much maligned, grossly underpaid, not-the- upper-class staff of 1.3 million…
  • Can keep it all going every day of the year…
  • Running on a tight budget with little flexibility to hand out carrots…

Inspires the locals to achieve this,

What is your excuse?

Read here:   

Mithila artists transform local railway station with traditional Madhubani art

The Madhubani Railway station, in Bihar just got a makeover. One of the oldest rail stations in India near Patna is now attracting tourists after hundreds of local Mithila artists adorned the walls of the station with world-famous Madhubani paintings – scenes from Ramayana and Mahabharata among other things.

The excruciating work was undertaken as a Swachh Bharat mission and has been done free of cost as ‘Shramdaan’ in an attempt to promote the traditional art form besides beautifying the station, the largest of its kind and first in Bihar. At least 7,000 sqft area at this Bihar station under the East Central Railway (ECR) has been decked up in about 20 days, railways supplying paints and brushes. (Source: DRM Samastipur/ Twitter )

The colourful Madhubani painting is quite unique with its signature geometrical patterns and motifs.

Many young artists volunteered for the project who have been learning the ancient artwork since childhood, their families in this trade for generations.

A wedding ritual.

From walls at the stations to sign boards at the platforms, this is no less than a wonderland!

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Source: Indian Express, etc.

S. Mani, a senior ex-colleague and a good friend responded with the info that the railway station at Pandavapura (Karnataka) where he resides too is embellished with beautiful paintings focusing on the tourist spots around, at the initiative of the Station Master Shri Madhu hailing from Trichy. A few of the snaps sent by SM:

Thanks, SM.

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Well… precision in expression is a virtue worth pursuing – now both engineers and non- can be more specific when you get screwed:-)))

Mechanical engineering network

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Source: Mechanical engineering network

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