Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Excellence’ Category

Watch this short clip here, don’t miss.

Vide Gopalswamy

End

 

 

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Not as easy and obvious as it appears for most of us, ordinary mortals – I meant the ‘making happy’ part, not about selling ice-creams:-)

23380394_496344164061810_8994766677922771661_n rajiv jalota.jpg

 

End

Read Full Post »

The Asian Entrepreneur

Competence and wisdom of a source of information, instruction or inspiration, be it a book, a teacher, a consultant or the net, can show a simpler and surer way out or mire one in unending complexity.

Here’s a metaphorical illustration from Ray’s Daily:

**

The new family in the neighborhood overslept and the six year old daughter missed her school bus.

The father, though late for work, agreed to drive her if she’d direct him to the school. They rode several blocks before she told him to turn the first time, several more before she indicated another turn.  This went on for 20 minutes — yet when they finally reached the school, it proved to be only a short distance from their home.

Asked why she’d led the father over such a circuitous route, the child explained, “That’s the way the school bus goes, and it’s the only way I know.”

**

End

 

Source: image from asianentrepreneur.org

Read Full Post »

From curlytales:

This Door In UAE Will Open Only If You Smile

SMILE

A new initiative launched by Ajman Public Transport Corporation in UAE ensures that customers can only exit if they smile at the sensor.

The Public Transport Corporation in Ajman has launched a quirky new initiative where customers exiting the place need to smile at the sensor, allowing them to exit. In the event that a customer indicates their dissatisfaction by not smiling, officials at the center would assist the client to resolve the issue.

The initiative will help increase customer satisfaction. According to Omar Mohammed Lootah, CEO of operations, at the corporation, a smile helps bring to life the organization by breaking the monotony of the office. As soon as customers enter the corporation office, they are greeted by ‘Marhabani’ staff – who can speak Arabic, English, Urdu and Bengali.

Here’s a clip (2.13 mins)

 

End

Read Full Post »

And it’s unbelievably cheap too while yielding immense safety benefits!

From an article (and clips) here by Christoph Roser, brought up by Gopalakrishna Sunderrajan:

Look at this short clip (49 secs):

What is the train driver pointing at and what is he saying?

The technique of ‘Point and Call‘ is practiced by the Japanese railway companies from around 1900, and it is now widespread throughout Japan. And to a little extent, however not with the same rigor, outside of railways too.

With Japanese railroads, anything that has to be looked at is usually confirmed using point and call. First and foremost, this is for observing railroad signals that indicate whether the train is allowed to proceed, whether there are speed restrictions, or whether the train needs to stop. For example, when a speed limit starts in 500 meters, the train driver points at the sign and says, “Limit 75 Distance 500.

The technique is also used to verify the timetable. At every stop, the driver points to the corresponding line in the timetable to verify the target arrival and departure times. For example, when leaving the station, the driver points at the timetable and says, “Three o’ clock 12 minutes 15 seconds depart Shibuya station.

While the train stops, the speed is verified by pointing at the speedometer. Platform attendants and conductors also point along the platform to check if the train is clear, often also pointing at additional surveillance monitors for this purpose. For example, the conductor points at the doors after closing and states, “Good Closure,” then points at the monitors and states, “Good monitors for departure.

Pointing and Calling combines looking at something, pointing at it, calling out the observation, and listening to your own voice, giving co-action and co-reaction among the operator’s brain, eyes, hands, mouth, and ears. Not only looking but also pointing and sometimes stating the observation avoids sloppiness and helps keep focus and attention. For simple tasks (and most of these tasks are reasonably simple), this technique reduces errors by almost 85%. Some companies use only pointing, or only calling, but the technique is most effective when combined.

Here’s another clip on the subject (3.55 mins):

The article appeared in the beginning of 2014. Surprisingly for some reason this easy-to-implement innovative practice does not seem to have caught on yet outside of Japan.

End

 

Read Full Post »

We all know about one of the most-talked-about routes to take to innovation: ‘value disruption’.

For example:

1 Who Killed The Business

(from Who Killed The Business?)

But “it’s not always an easy situation to deal with, simply because it often creates discomfort and pain.  This usually results in a sense of uncertainty and instability, which we, as people, are neurologically wired to react to and move away from.”

Janet Sernack puts her finger on two important attributes that enhances the ability to disruptingly innovate. While the basic idea may not be new, its articulation certainly is, giving us a handle for building these up – some food for performance coaches’ thoughts and action:

It’s all about ‘gumption and grit.

Gumption is defined by the Cambridge Dictionary as “the ability to decide what is the best thing to do in a particular situation, and to do it with energy and determination.”  

 And grit in the context of behavior is defined as “firmness of character; indomitable spirit” according to Merriam-Webster dictionary, adapted (by Angela Duckworth, in her TED talk) to include “perseverance and passion for long-term goals.” 

 Sernack explains:

This requires people to let go of being “nice” worrying about being politically correct, to develop innovation and collaboration, by being intentionally and safely contrary, provocative and disruptive involving:

  • Gumption; deeply cleansing people’s minds, to let go of old fixed, conventional and avoidance mindsets, risk adversity, fear of failure, complacency and other normal & habitual resistance factors to change they might have, without making them “wrong.”
  • Grit; passionately persevering being contrary, provocative and safely disruptive to achieve innovation goals and outcomes.

necessary to survive, achieve and thrive in VUCA times (situations or environments that engender high levels of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity).

She goes on to combine these two into a single skill-set ‘being provocatively competent’ and identifies its key characteristics in her post here.

 

End

Read Full Post »

From Jason Fried’s blog here (minimally edited) pointed to by Wally Bock .

It’s Bezos expressing himself in Q&A session conducted years ago about people who are “right a lot” and those who aren’t

His observation about people who are “right a lot”:

Bezo Says

People who were right a lot of the time were people who often changed their minds. He doesn’t think consistency of thought is a particularly positive trait. It’s perfectly healthy — encouraged, even — to have an idea tomorrow that contradicted your idea today.

The smartest people are constantly revising their understanding, reconsidering a problem they thought they’d already solved. They’re open to new points of view, new information, new ideas, contradictions, and challenges to their own way of thinking.

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a well formed point of view, but it means you should consider your point of view as temporary.

And what trait signified someone who was wrong a lot of the time? Someone obsessed with details that only support one point of view. If someone can’t climb out of the details, and see the bigger picture from multiple angles, they’re often wrong most of the time.

 

 

 

End

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »