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Weeks ago, my daughter visiting from US brought a small device.

It was a night lamp. With a motion sensor!

Peel off the cover on its back and stick it to the wall and you’re on. As simple as that.

So when it finds someone walking, it lights up the way.

And thoughtfully it comes in pairs.

Useful to help the old, for example, when they get up in the night sleepy-eyed to go to toilet. One device for the way up and another for return, especially when there is a bend.

Costs some $25 to $30.

Here’s a simple device that makes tending a wee bit easier and life safer for the old. Am sure there must be other uses too.

But it’ll be years before it’s made in this country, if at all.

It’s nothing new – the concept and the opportunity of putting electronics and miniaturization to help in daily life for some strange reason never captured the fancy of young engineers and entrepreneurs in this country. And with it a huge potential for employment for self and others.

What happened years ago comes to mind. I had a long daily commute from Chembur to workplace in Seepz. At one point in Ghatkopar, our vehicle would tee off into the road through Asalpha. After plodding through heavy traffic for a few kilometers unsuspectingly, we would find the road blocked – merrily dug up by the authorities or some utility company.  What else but to trace back to the point and take a long detour losing precious time in the busy morning hours. Why couldn’t they tell us about it in time? A communication problem amenable to some simple solution with electronics. Of course, in absence of anything else, a placard with an announcement would have served the purpose.

The arrival of and the revolution brought in by pagers and later mobile devices elsewhere in the world failed miserably to ignite any kind of similar innovation in this land.

This is not limited only to the field of communication. Consider this simple but dire need: Until recently we did not have a reliable and inexpensive way of timely switching on and off of pumps drawing water from the municipal mains to storage tanks atop apartments. The guy on duty would turn on the pump, go goofing about and return ‘aaraamse’ from his chai and gossip and switch it off but not before the floors and adjacent parts of the road had been washed clean by the overflowing water. Even today in times when water is scarce, installing these devices are not mandated by corporations to plug wastage!! A small opportunity to create a market place for electronics and its supply chain missed 😦

Areas like entertainment electronics, avionics, computers…are ‘to dhoor ki bhat’.

With a huge population, increased urbanization, improved standard of living and the burgeoning need for a range of services, possibilities of tapping into electronics are mind-boggling.

But we won’t – it’ll all come from China or Taiwan while our youth bitch and moan, blame the government for the ills or in some parts of the country turn into professional protesters available to politicians for hire! Or, turn into programmers!

To heck with sensors, devices, prime-movers, iot…as long as we have those dumb guys in China churning them out…

Is it because tinkering with things is essentially not part of our dna? We make poor engineers with hardware? Of course we always made pots and beads, as archaeological digs reveal. No questions.

So much for leadership in education, enterprise and nation building:-(

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PS: Have no idea how ISRO and a few organizations in defense and private sectors pull along amidst such a dismal ecosystem. Just as it’s a wonder how those magnificent temple edifices in the south and elsewhere were constructed – did China supply them too? Kidding 🙂

This time I’m not kidding. At the risk of appearing quixotic, may I suggest for every software professional of ours US employs directly or indirectly, we employ/import a technician, engineer or an entrepreneur from that country to the extent BOP allows. This will give us a kick-start in real engineering capabilities with hardware and establishing a nourishing ecosystem we are unable to set up on our own.

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Use-cases lying on the edge of system scope and occurring infrequently are usually the ones that get overlooked in gathering requirements and, often, also the ones to trip systems.

This could be a case in point:

Bollywood actor-director Rahul Bose recently shared a video of an incident on his Twitter page.

In the video, Bose can be heard saying,So I’m shooting in Chandigarh and I’m staying in this beautiful suite at the JW Mariott, where they give you all these elegant freebies like these chocolate cookies and God knows how much these flowers must have cost. But get this – I was in the gym and I asked for two bananas while I was working out and, of course, I got the bananas. Check the bill out. They’re just too good for me. Well done, JW Marriott Chandigarh.” The bill mentioned Bose’s order as ‘Fruit Platter’, which was shown to have a price of INR 375. Added to that was the GST, which brought the price of the bananas to a total of INR 442.50…

To get the perspective, the farmer from the village might have sold it for less than INR 1 each.

Could be, as pointed out by some, the guy at the other end had no way of entering into his system an order for just two banana’s? He merely selected one of those available items on the menu? Sounds plausible.

The hotel had not reacted so far.

While the opening remarks on the edge cases are generally true, in India they may not be so infrequent and hence may need more attention.

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Source: NDTV Food Desk  |  Updated: July 24, 2019 14:31 IST

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He was an efficient heads-down, nose-to-the-wheel, eyes-on-the-ball manager of the operations, executing projects on time, using resources optimally…a relentless pusher.

But then he just did not have it in him to inspire his people to perform beyond the expected, pursue worthwhile challenges….Saw the projects as something to be completed and move on. What excitement, eh?

Quite convinced about the soundness of his views and approach.

Some of the best guys were ground down to mediocrity under his heavily task oriented leadership – they were hardly aware of what was happening.

Such managers are found in plenty especially in software industry. More so at senior levels.

Instead of dismissing them managers as misfit – their task orientation is abs necessary in projects – it may be a better approach to address the paradox by strengthening the structure with additional resources to inject excitement, innovation and challenge into projects. Resulting conflicts if any are not unmanageable if the manager gets the perspective right.  

A question may arise: are we unnecessarily and unfairly complicating the poor manager’s life with unreasonable expectations on excitement, innovation and challenge?

These are no longer nice-to-have’s. They serve multiple purposes of a) delivering enhanced value to the customer, b) keeping the professionals engaged and absorbed – does enormous good for employee motivation and retention and c) building expertise, reusable production and marketing assets…

In fact every project is a great opportunity for the org to profit by the above.

You still think it’s a choice?

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ux app

 

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Source: pinterest

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These are some interesting jottings, edited for brevity, made by Robert Lewis attending a recent SAP’s Retail Executive Forum held in New York (see below for a short profile of RL). Noteworthy is SAP’s robust confidence and optimism in its products and solutions enabling the woebegone Retail face today’s challenges to a ‘T’ more than ever before. Occasional comments amplifying the point being made are included in italics.

 

During the Forum, SAP successfully provided a new storyline for the future of retail <instead of shying away from a segment finding itself in shambles>. First, they transformed the popular negative narrative of chaos, disruption, and apocalypse to a “new normal” which they anointed the “retail renaissance.” As Matt Laukaitis, SVP and General Manager, SAP Retail NA said, “Let’s forget the doom and gloom. We’re here to share what works – the strategies for how you can adapt, lead, and thrive – and drive your own success.” <All is not lost, SAP assures and proceeds to talk about what it brings to the table for its customer’s success!>

Second, they provided a major learning experience of the positive significance of the technology revolution <and this is the key to its success>. SAP’s comprehensive understanding, among other things, of the multitude of value chains, from product and service creation, all the way through consumption <its core technology> may be used effectively to assess each customer’s desire and ultimately end with the perfect delivery of these individualized wants and needs through technology in all of its various formatsYes, I know this sounds like stating the obvious, but the obvious becomes brilliant when successfully implemented. And there were many examples of how to achieve such success <these reassuring stories lend credence to its claims>.

SAP

<Importantly, on the way forward> Other keynotes by SAP executives and industry leaders were insightful about the new generation of consumers who are defining a whole new socioeconomic culture, totally reassessing value and values. The next gen is essentially redefining what value is beyond price. And it’s not just about new products, services or experiences. It’s about what you stand for. How you conduct business. Why you matter. And how you are helping to make the world better. “While winning retailers have always known the importance of putting the customer first, those who evolve to holistically combine a customer centric approach with authentic branded promise across social, value, (and social value), experience, and ethics, are those who are succeeding at a greater rate now and truly defining the future “says Laukaitis.

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Source: therobinreport.com/author/rlewis/

About Robin Lewis: Founder and CEO of The Robin Report. An author, speaker, and consultant for the retail and consumer products industries. Co-authored the book: “The New Rules of Retail.” As a VP at Goldman Sachs, he launched a retail consulting practice. Prior to this, he was an EVP and Executive Editor at WWD, and a VP of Strategy and Business Development at the VF Corporation. He is frequently requested by C-level management for advice, consultation and strategic presentations by many marquee retailers and financial firms. And, often quoted in all of the major print and broadcast media.

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Some have all the luck!

China 1

2

China 3

China 4

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Source: net

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How a rest stop on the side of the road inspired a web page design

Introducing the YesAQars ago I was driving back to Chicago from Wisconsin. On the Illinois side there are a couple of rest stops over the tollway. It’s a great place to get some gas, grab some caffeine, and stretch your legs a little before the final 50 miles home.

The rest stop usually has a booth where you can buy a iPass so you don’t need to stop and pay tolls all the time. During the day there’s a person in the booth to help answer any questions you have.

It appears that a lot of the same questions are asked over and over. Enough, in fact, that the person who answers them is sick of giving the same answer. That answer is “Yes”.

So they jumped on a computer somewhere and put together what I can only describe as one of the smartest formats for an FAQ I’ve ever seen. A single answer on top, and all the questions below. The answer is always YES!! YES, YES. YES!! Then they taped it to the outside of the booth. You can’t miss it.

Yes Page

I thought this was brilliant. I just love it. Yeah, it’s full of passive aggression and spelling errors and formatting problems, but the idea in itself is so refreshing. It’s folk information art.

Inspired by this, we whipped up our own version of a YES! page for Basecamp 3. It was a fun exercise in messaging and design. We call it the YesAQ.

Yes Page 2

Check it out.

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Source: From here.

 

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