Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Job’ Category

Kaleidoscope

It was a Monday morning.

Ravi entered his manager’s cabin with some paper in his hand.

Wishing to be left alone, the Manager looked up, offering little encouragement for a commencing conversation.

Ravi announced softly: ‘Sir, I am resigning.’

He could have said ‘there was no cream for the coffee-maker’ or even ‘the office printer had run out of ink’.

Manager: ‘What is it?’

Ravi repeated himself, raising his voice a wee bit: ‘Sir, I’m leaving.’

Words going home this time, Manager yelped like a puppy hurt in an encounter with an unyielding object: ‘What happened?’

Ravi stood his ground: ‘Nothing sudden, Sir, have been thinking for a while. Got a job in Bajaj Allianz!’

Manager let out a long breath: ‘I know you have talked to me sometime ago about a rise. I had meant to do something about it. Is that the issue? If it is, we can…

View original post 192 more words

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

M is your guy to grab…not many around like him.

Read on to know what I meant:

Episode 1: When he stopped ‘it’ in its tracks…unbelievable!

He was visiting Hyderabad (Begumpet airport, Secunderabad) from Chennai, in by the morning and scheduled to return by the evening flight 6.30 pm, flying both ways on propeller-driven Avro.  Till 5.30 he was checking up regularly on flight departure and he was told it was uncertain due to unfavorable weather conditions at Chennai. And then they said the flight was cancelled for the day. M happened to be nearby and hence rushed to Indian Airlines office to check on alternatives available – booking wasn’t online then.

He was in their office by 6 pm when he learnt the Avro flight was after all leaving on time! He blew his top for the  misinformation and insisted on taking that flight as he would be able to reach the airport in the next 10 minutes. It wasn’t possible, he was told. Not one DNA’ed to take a ‘no’, M insisted they inform the duty-officer (DO) at the airport about his coming in regardless. Disconnecting without waiting for a response, he rushed to airport and was at the counter by 6.25. The staff quite expectedly refused to check him in. He rushed to the DO who also regretted his inability to help, pointing out to the aircraft all ready to move with the ground staff closing the formalities and giving thumbs-up to the pilot. He threatened the DO he’ll rush out and stop the aircraft which is what exactly M did next! He jumped the security; chased by all including DO, he outran all of them reaching the aircraft just then beginning to move.

Fearing worse, the DO did what he could to keep M out of his hair: the aircraft was halted, the ladder expressly brought in, a boarding-pass printed…was he happy to see M’s back as the door closed!!

Today, of course, a mere attempt in the direction or even an expression of such intent would get him arrested!

Episode 2: Just the man for the herd

The Air-India flight from Dubai to Mumbai was for some reason diverted to Delhi. Obviously there was total commotion and clamor for seats to make the onward journey. The staff at AI counter were simply unable to handle the onslaught. Just the scene cut out for our man to jump in. M managed to push himself to the front – his lean frame lets him move edge-ways! – climbed onto the counter and raised his voice to cow down the belligerent passengers to some order. He then asked them to make up different queues: one for families with small children, another for senior citizens and, lastly, others. Further M declared seats shall be allotted in the same order of the queues i.e. beginning with the families with small children. Some in the third lot were not happy with it, pressing on their needs as urgent over others. He got the duty-officer (DO) also to make a concurring announcement and stick with it.

M made his wife and children (not small) to stand aside, not wanting to be seen as self-seeking. Thence it was smooth-going: the first lot and the second were accommodated in full. About a third of the rest could also be pushed through before the flight was full up. The remaining, including his family, had to perforce wait for another flight. He arranged with the DO to authorize priority seating for them on the next flight. Finally when the counters opened for their flight, our man duly queued up with others. That’s when he was called to meet up with the DO. The DO thanked M heartily for helping them manage a chaotic scene and gave him the glad tidings of an upgrade for his family and him to first-class – a fine gesture from AI!

These two episodes – it wasn’t easy to choose from the many on hand – give you a flavor of what M was and is.

It may just be possible yet to tempt M with a challenge, to come out of his peaceful retirement in a community off the city of Mysore. A word of caution however: liaising, lobbying, scratching people’s back…are not M’s cup of coffee as also underhand dealings of any kind. A square-shooter of the old school, that’s what Mani is and what you get, dealing with him.

 

End

Read Full Post »

Recruitment

DM is the CEO of Sandler Training and the author of  THE ROAD TO EXCELLENCE: 6 Leadership Strategies To Build A Bulletproof Business.

End

 

 

Source: skipprichard.com

Read Full Post »

4e392aacf0d0b0acff7e1f73ee6b87ef

 

End

 

 

Source: Pinterest

Read Full Post »

Employers want you to ask this question. Here’s why

A tip from J.T. O’Donnell, founder and CEO of Work It Daily, a site dedicated to helping people solve their own career problems.

(Lightly edited, interspersed with occasional amplifying comments in italics)

Anyone who has been on an interview knows there usually comes a point at the end of the meeting where the interviewer says to the interviewee, “Do you have any questions?” You may be wondering whether it’s OK to ask some. Or if you should just say, “I’m good,” so as to not take up any more of their time. Having been a hiring manager myself and working with thousands of them on a regular basis, I can tell you failing to ask questions can hurt your chances of getting the job

You can increase the chances of getting the job when you prove you can solve their problems and alleviate their pain. Therefore, the best question <in fact he recommends a longer list if situation permits> to ask in the interview is:

“What’s the company’s biggest threat to success this year, and how will I be able to help overcome it in this role?”

By asking this, you’re giving the employer the opportunity to articulate how this position (and the person it it!) can offer the biggest impact. They’re literally telling you how you can meet and exceed their expectations! Once they answer this question, you’ll then have an opportunity to respond and even share some of your past experience that relates to what they said. This is how to reinforce the fact you understand what’s important to them. This gives the hiring manager greater confidence that you’re the candidate who will do the best job… it also helps you decide if you will survive and thrive as an employee there. That’s why you should always have a list of questions ready to ask before you leave!

Don’t Forget, Interviewing Is a Two-Way Street

End

 

Source: inc.com/jt-odonnell/managers-say-asking-this-1-question-in-a-job-interview-increases-chances-you-get-hired.html

Read Full Post »

George Buckley

These words come in at a time when reality perceived to be very complex and no one claims to have all answers. Today organizations are said to prefer smart and empowered individuals homed in flatter structures to command-driven ‘tools’ embedded in deep hierarchies.

Reality is better served, one would think, by a middle ‘gray’ with a place, time and degree for either approaches..

Perhaps Buckley made the observation in a context that wasn’t included.

End

 

 

Source: managementtoday.co.uk

Read Full Post »

and the sticks too.

From Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by  Daniel H. Pink via Delancey.com (lightly edited)

 “…

“Behavioral scientists often divide what we do on the job or learn in school into two categories: ‘algorithmic’ and ‘heuristic.’ An algorithmic task is one in which you follow a set of established instructions down a single pathway to one conclusion. That is, there’s an algorithm for solving it. A heuristic task is the opposite. Precisely because no algorithm exists for it, you have to experiment with possibilities and devise a novel solution. Working as a grocery checkout clerk is mostly algorithmic. You do pretty much the same thing over and over in a certain way. Creating an ad campaign is mostly heuristic. So are designing new software, inventing new products…

“During the twentieth century, most work was algorithmic — and not just jobs where you turned the same screw the same way all day long. Even when we traded blue collars for white, the tasks we carried out were often routine. That is, we could reduce much of what we did — in accounting, law, computer programming, and other fields — to a script, a spec sheet, a formula, or a series of steps that produced a right answer. … The consulting firm McKinsey & Co. estimates that in the United States, only 30 percent of job growth now comes from algorithmic work, while 70 percent comes from heuristic work. A key reason: Routine work can be outsourced or automated; artistic, empathetic, non-routine work generally cannot.

“The implications for motivation are vast. Researchers such as Harvard Business School’s Teresa Amabile have found that external rewards and punishments — both carrots and sticks — can work nicely for algorithmic tasks. But they can be devastating for heuristic ones…

Rewards, by their very nature, narrow our focus. That’s helpful when there’s a clear path to a solution. They help us stare ahead and race faster. But ‘if-then’ motivators are terrible for [complex conceptual problems]. As experiments show, the rewards narrowed people’s focus and blinkered the wide view that might have allowed them to see new uses for old objects.”

…”

 

End

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »