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From Inc. (lightly edited):

Walmart Just Created a Side Hustle for Its 1 Million Employees

By Chad Perry, Senior Sales Leader 
walmart-02-2017_222426

These days, you’ll be hard pressed to find an individual who isn’t working a side gig or side hustle.

In the old days, it was paper routes and second jobs. Today, many side hustlers aspire to be the next internet star or consulting guru. But most are simply looking to make an extra buck or two.

Don’t believe me?

Look around your company and you’re sure to find more than one individual hustling on the side. And that’s from the front lines all the way to the executive suite.

In a brilliant move, Walmart just tapped into the “make money on the side” desire of its employees.

The Walmart Associate Delivery Program

In a Walmart blog post Thursday, Marc Lore, president and CEO of Walmart U.S. e-commerce, announced the testing of an associate delivery concept.

The model is pretty simple: Associates are able to opt in to deliver groceries on their way home from work.

Associates can choose how many packages to deliver, along with the size and weight, and also which days they want to deliver.

(Some sources report that Walmart will limit the number of associate deliveries to 10 a day. The remaining deliveries will be handled by carriers like UPS and FedEx.)

Walmart then uses technology to match deliveries and associates. The technology will never take an associate too far out of their way home.

Here’s why the move is brilliant.

The Hunter Becomes the Hunted

Walmart was once considered the unbeatable juggernaut, gobbling up anything in its path. Today, Amazon has grown to two times the size of Walmart, and threatens to devour it.

Amazon has built a delivery network of over 40 cargo jets, truck fleets, drivers, and, in the not-too-distant future, drones. Many have speculated that this network will be the downfall of Walmart.

But, in one single action, Walmart tapped into the latent needs of more than a million employees, and now has a home delivery force to rival that of Amazon. For little to no extra cost (certainly less than Amazon spent).

The Lesson of Latent Employee Needs

Walmart knows that many of its employees are no doubt working side hustles. We all have employees and co-workers who are doing the exact same thing.

Why not keep it in the family? Why not build greater employee loyalty and improve the customer experience (because your employees are more loyal)?

Why not make the side hustle an on-the-way-home hustle? Why not be both the employer and the side hustle?

And that is the brilliant lesson we can learn from Walmart: There are latent needs in every employee. Tap into them, and you’ll find yourself with an increase in bandwidth, productivity, and skill-sets.

End

 

 

 

Source: Inc.com

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From Seth Godin:

” 

And we just had a winner

The local market has a sign that says, “There was a $500 Lotto winner here…”

A cursory knowledge of statistics will help you see that this doesn’t matter. It doesn’t make it more likely or less likely that they’ll have a winner today or even tomorrow.

And yet…

And yet sales go up after a big win. And to veer to the tragic, when a friend is struck with a serious disease, we’re more likely to go to the doctor.

Because proximity is truth.

The truth of experience, the truth of immediacy, the truth of it might just happen to me.

That’s why the media has been such a powerful force, because it brings the distant much closer.

And why small communities of interest and connection are still the dominant force in our culture. Because people like us, do things like this.

This throws up interesting possibilities and directions for designing online experiences,

End

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Extracted from an interesting short piece by Christian Madsbjerg is the author of SENSEMAKING: The Power of the Humanities in the Age of the Algorithm:

Silicon Valley needs to get schooled

Silicon Valley is getting antsy. It’s been awhile since we were collectively wowed by the next big thing. The iPhone is ten years old. Uber is eight. The problem isn’t a lack of ideas. As engineers keep breaking new ground, it seems like anything will be possible soon. Why aren’t more of these technologies breaking through to our everyday lives?

What Silicon Valley is missing is an understanding of people—what is meaningful to them, the way they live their day to day lives, what would make a difference for them on an ordinary Tuesday in Phoenix or Shanghai. There is a dearth of deep, nuanced cultural knowledge

From my experience working with major corporations, I would say that technological advancements are only half of the picture. Knowing how to build things is great, but if you have no idea for whom you’re building them—how these inventions will connect with people’s aspirations and challenges—you will fail, no matter how many coding geniuses and data scientists you employ.

If you, like me, are a reader of great novels, you know that almost visceral sensation when you come to understand the world of someone else – the suffering of an Afghan woman, enduring abuse and horrendous conditions to spear her loved ones, or the drab misery of life as an IRS clerk in middle America, someone who had always imagined his life would turn out differently. Literatures—like in-depth journalism, plays, music, art, and even activities like cooking—can put you in the shoes of people unlike you in profound, empathetic way. But the importance of these activities is under attack from the big data-mindset that has invaded both Silicon Valley and many of the world’s biggest corporations.

Spend a few days immersed in a great novel by Tolstoy or with the work of Greek scientist and poet Ptolemy and one is forced to acknowledge that nothing is ever entirely disrupted nor is anything ever completely new. Learning does not function independently of what has come before, but rather in dialogue with it. If executives at Google had taken some time to contemplate this fact, they might have avoided the disastrous rollout to their Google Glass product in 2014. The technology itself functioned just fine. In a narrow Silicon Valley perspective, Google Glass might be considered a successful technology. But when does a piece of technology ever exist independent of a world, a societal structure and culture? Yes, the glasses “worked” but did they belong? Google Glass wearers were dubbed “Glassholes” and people shunned Google Glass wearers at social events. Silicon Valley may have new technology, but in this instance it failed at the much larger challenge of understanding how people relate to one another.

When we use a skill set based in the humanities to understand the world, we gain insight into these deeper issues. And these are the factors that actually drive business forward. Let’s return to China: one by one, the world’s biggest and most cutting edge Silicon Valley companies—Yahoo, eBay, MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, Groupon, and, finally Google—have attempted to develop a meaningful market there. They have come armed with all of the best technical knowledge along with plenty of cash and intellectual property. And yet, today, Internet market leaders in China are still local: Alibaba, Baidu and TenCent.

Technical superiority is a very small part of this story. Limited by their “Silicon Valley” state of mind, American companies simply had no feel for the nuances that made the Chinese marketplace different. With a deeper immersion into the lives of Chinese consumers as well as into their literature, history and religion, technologists might have grasped the more subtle differences between professional and personal network building in Chinese society

When we stop valuing culture, we become blind to the very opportunities that drive “world changing” technology to mass adoption. The greatest challenges and opportunities of the twenty-first century are cultural, not algorithmic. And the greatest tools for the study and understanding of culture exist within the wealth of theories and methodologies that make up the humanities.

To those of you with a liberal arts degree, I say this: your skills are essential in today’s world, and more companies need to recognize that. To those of you with a STEM degree (or who never bothered with college in the first place), I would say: pick up a book or two every month. Go to plays. Travel and immerse yourself in a culture unlike your own.

Without a deep, empathetic understanding of other people, turning that good idea into the next big thing may prove elusive.

End

 

The original article may be read here.

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to make it as easy and pleasant for the folks.

KRBlog A T and T Transaction

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Tom Fisfburne, a career marketer, a coach and a consultant has a lot of interesting things to say on his subject. Excerpted from his blog post here.

hate-selling

Rafat Ali of Skift described how travel brands market to customers as “hate-selling”:

“Delta’s lowest fare seats comes with tons of restrictions, and its ecommerce team thought it would be a great idea to hate-sell it,  implying: “Here’s is what you don’t get, you cheap shit!” Passive-aggressive selling at its best. Or worst.”

hate-selling-2
…”

The post attracted an interesting comment from a reader seeing nothing wrong though…:

Steve Willson says

I’m actually pleased to see that Delta is explicitly laying out what you DON’T get if you book their lowest price fares. We so often see news reports and travel site posts after the fact with folks complaining that they didn’t know that they might not get seated with their companion, or that they didn’t get a meal. Those of us who travel a lot understand the lunacy of “modern” air travel, but those who are infrequent travellers may still be stuck in the romantic era. So maybe we just need to frame the conversation a bit differently…

“At Delta we look forward to having you onboard, but here are a few reminders before you complete your ticket purchase…”

Maybe I’m jaded, but I go for transparency whenever possible:)

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Watch out, rules are changing! Read till the end.

whatever-haappened-to-selling-we-knew-about

 

End

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