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And it’s unbelievably cheap too while yielding immense safety benefits!

From an article (and clips) here by Christoph Roser, brought up by Gopalakrishna Sunderrajan:

Look at this short clip (49 secs):

What is the train driver pointing at and what is he saying?

The technique of ‘Point and Call‘ is practiced by the Japanese railway companies from around 1900, and it is now widespread throughout Japan. And to a little extent, however not with the same rigor, outside of railways too.

With Japanese railroads, anything that has to be looked at is usually confirmed using point and call. First and foremost, this is for observing railroad signals that indicate whether the train is allowed to proceed, whether there are speed restrictions, or whether the train needs to stop. For example, when a speed limit starts in 500 meters, the train driver points at the sign and says, “Limit 75 Distance 500.

The technique is also used to verify the timetable. At every stop, the driver points to the corresponding line in the timetable to verify the target arrival and departure times. For example, when leaving the station, the driver points at the timetable and says, “Three o’ clock 12 minutes 15 seconds depart Shibuya station.

While the train stops, the speed is verified by pointing at the speedometer. Platform attendants and conductors also point along the platform to check if the train is clear, often also pointing at additional surveillance monitors for this purpose. For example, the conductor points at the doors after closing and states, “Good Closure,” then points at the monitors and states, “Good monitors for departure.

Pointing and Calling combines looking at something, pointing at it, calling out the observation, and listening to your own voice, giving co-action and co-reaction among the operator’s brain, eyes, hands, mouth, and ears. Not only looking but also pointing and sometimes stating the observation avoids sloppiness and helps keep focus and attention. For simple tasks (and most of these tasks are reasonably simple), this technique reduces errors by almost 85%. Some companies use only pointing, or only calling, but the technique is most effective when combined.

Here’s another clip on the subject (3.55 mins):

The article appeared in the beginning of 2014. Surprisingly for some reason this easy-to-implement innovative practice does not seem to have caught on yet outside of Japan.

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We all know about one of the most-talked-about routes to take to innovation: ‘value disruption’.

For example:

1 Who Killed The Business

(from Who Killed The Business?)

But “it’s not always an easy situation to deal with, simply because it often creates discomfort and pain.  This usually results in a sense of uncertainty and instability, which we, as people, are neurologically wired to react to and move away from.”

Janet Sernack puts her finger on two important attributes that enhances the ability to disruptingly innovate. While the basic idea may not be new, its articulation certainly is, giving us a handle for building these up – some food for performance coaches’ thoughts and action:

It’s all about ‘gumption and grit.

Gumption is defined by the Cambridge Dictionary as “the ability to decide what is the best thing to do in a particular situation, and to do it with energy and determination.”  

 And grit in the context of behavior is defined as “firmness of character; indomitable spirit” according to Merriam-Webster dictionary, adapted (by Angela Duckworth, in her TED talk) to include “perseverance and passion for long-term goals.” 

 Sernack explains:

This requires people to let go of being “nice” worrying about being politically correct, to develop innovation and collaboration, by being intentionally and safely contrary, provocative and disruptive involving:

  • Gumption; deeply cleansing people’s minds, to let go of old fixed, conventional and avoidance mindsets, risk adversity, fear of failure, complacency and other normal & habitual resistance factors to change they might have, without making them “wrong.”
  • Grit; passionately persevering being contrary, provocative and safely disruptive to achieve innovation goals and outcomes.

necessary to survive, achieve and thrive in VUCA times (situations or environments that engender high levels of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity).

She goes on to combine these two into a single skill-set ‘being provocatively competent’ and identifies its key characteristics in her post here.

 

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Sanmargam

No odious comparison or put-down’s:

Shahid Akhtar, studies Physics & Technology at Ajyal Almaarefah International School, Jizan Quora hpih

Thinking about it, employee engagement is not very diff from bringing up children! A similar situation that readily comes to mind is the recognition of team performance versus an individual’s.

Just when this post was being put together, this comes along: This Burger King employee was shamed on social media – her story here makes a sad reading.

In our daily bustle, we forget garbage needs to be removed, burgers flipped…

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Source: Contributed in Quora by Shahid Akhtar studying Physics & Technology at Ajyal Almaarefah International School, Jizan

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PM

What we knew all along about the constraints in executing projects, Mike Shipulski has summed up very nicely in a short blog post, reproduced here below (no share button available) with comments added in italics:

There are four ways to run projects.

One – 80% Right, 100% Done, 100% On Time, 100% On Budget

  • Fix time
  • Fix resources
  • Flex scope and certainty

Set a tight timeline and use the people and budget you have.  You’ll be done on time, but you must accept a reduced scope (fewer bells and whistles) and less certainty of how the product/service will perform and how well it will be received by customers. This is a good way to go when you’re starting a new adventure or investigating new space.

Get it out there as early as possible, follow up with iterations/releases/sprints…Also for new products. Suitable where requirements are volatile or not understood clearly.

Two – 100% Right, 100% Done, 0% On Time, 0% On Budget

  • Fix resources
  • Fix scope and certainty
  • Flex time

Use the team and budget you have and tightly define the scope (features) and define the level of certainty required by your customers. Because you can’t predict when the project will be done, you’ll be late and over budget, but your offering will be right and customers will like it. Use this method when your brand is known for predictability and stability. But, be weary of business implications of being late to market.

Also for applications where failures have very low tolerance (example – public facing) or downright disastrous.  

Three – 100% Right, 100% Done, 100% On Time, 0% On Budget

  • Fix scope and certainty
  • Fix time
  • Flex resources

Tightly define the scope and level of certainty. Your customers will get what they expect and they’ll get it on time.  However, this method will be costly. If you hire contract resources, they will be expensive.  And if you use internal resources, you’ll have to stop one project to start this one. The benefits from the stopped project won’t be realized and will increase the effective cost to the company.  And even though time is fixed, this approach will likely be late.  It will take longer than planned to move resources from one project to another and will take longer than planned to hire contract resources and get them up and running.  Use this method if you’ve already established good working relationships with contract resources.  Avoid this method if you have difficulty stopping existing projects to start new ones.

‘Must be done at any cost’

Four – Not Right, Not Done, Not On Time, Not On Budget

  • Fix time
  • Fix resources
  • Fix scope and certainty

Though almost every project plan is based on this approach, it never works.  Sure, it would be great if it worked, but it doesn’t, it hasn’t and it won’t. There’s not enough time to do the right work, not enough money to get the work done on time and no one is willing to flex on scope and certainty.  Everyone knows it won’t work and we do it anyway.  The result – a stressful project that doesn’t deliver and no one feels good about.

Well, don’t we all know…

The article may be read here.

 

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Source: Image from explore.easyprojects.net

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From Jason Fried’s blog here (minimally edited) pointed to by Wally Bock .

It’s Bezos expressing himself in Q&A session conducted years ago about people who are “right a lot” and those who aren’t

His observation about people who are “right a lot”:

Bezo Says

People who were right a lot of the time were people who often changed their minds. He doesn’t think consistency of thought is a particularly positive trait. It’s perfectly healthy — encouraged, even — to have an idea tomorrow that contradicted your idea today.

The smartest people are constantly revising their understanding, reconsidering a problem they thought they’d already solved. They’re open to new points of view, new information, new ideas, contradictions, and challenges to their own way of thinking.

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a well formed point of view, but it means you should consider your point of view as temporary.

And what trait signified someone who was wrong a lot of the time? Someone obsessed with details that only support one point of view. If someone can’t climb out of the details, and see the bigger picture from multiple angles, they’re often wrong most of the time.

 

 

 

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‘Time Management’ is one topic that has had more keys punched for it than any other in management. Even so Eleanor Beaton’s (Founder – Fierce Feminine) is an interesting read for bringing back into focus an oft-forgotten aspect of time management. While she targets her short post at women entrepreneurs, it’s equally relevant for others too. Here’s an extract:

egypt.souq dot com

Why You Need to Quit Managing Your Time and Start Managing Your Boundaries

…But if your time management strategies are missing this one foundational ingredient, they are destined to render you nothing more a highly efficient producer of meaningless results.

So what’s the secret sauce that will catapult your productivity?

Your boundaries, otherwise known as those internally generated laws that govern what will work for you, and what won’t. Boundaries are the single most important and overlooked aspect of setting a priority and putting in the effort required to make it happen.

Think of your boundaries as bodyguards for your time and mental bandwidth. Without boundaries, your time is open for the pillaging by people who “just want to pick your brain,” by volunteer work that’s no longer meaningful, by needy clients or stakeholders who would benefit from a lesson in respecting the time of others.

And while many people struggle to set boundaries, the problem is particularly acute for women entrepreneurs, many of whom are juggling not only the needs of their growing businesses, but also the necessities of supporting aging parents, growing kids, personal relationships, health, and so on.

The challenge? Protecting your boundaries can involve conflict, because it will often mean you say no to someone else’s agenda in order to say yes to yours. This type of conflict can present problems for women, many of whom are socialized from a young age to create harmony and avoid conflict at all costs.

The short article appearing here includes ‘some practical strategies to help you identify, set and respect your boundaries, so you can protect your time and mental bandwidth’.

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Source: egypt.souq.com

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Colorbox com BOX24498601

Wonder why these questions did not occur to me until I read this article or if it did, I did not seriously go out seeking answers!!!

The questions:

Why does the earth rotate?

Why do the galaxies rotate?

Why do some planets rotate differently?

What is moon doing to our home?

Marcus Woo, Live Science Contributor, provides answers in a simple easy-to-read and a short article here !! If I could…

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Source: Image from colorbox.com

 

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