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to make it as easy and pleasant for the folks.

KRBlog A T and T Transaction

as long as algorithms work like this one did.

Clicking on a link given to me took to me as intended to a book on the renowned temple town of Srirangam:

(some parts edited out and some reformatting for clarity)

” 

krblog-sirangam-amazon

Srirangam Bhooloka Vaikuntam (First Edition) Hardcover – 2016

by J. Ramanan (Author), Vrindaramanan (Editor)

4.4 out of 5 stars    5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions

Hardcover 1,800.00

Delivery to pincode 600001 – Chennai between Mar 11 – 13. Details

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Description for Srirangam Bhooloka Vaikuntam (First Edition)

Pictorial tribute to Srirangam, the first of the 108 Divyadesams, this volume “Srirangam Bhooloka Vaikuntam” contains a compilation of interesting mythological legends, historical facts and figures, art and architecture & fascinating festivals. The highlight of this coffee-table book are the mesmerizing photographs of the temple precincts; of Nam Perumal, decorated and seated on various vahanas; the exile of Azhagiya Manavalan in the forests of Seshachalam at the foot hills of Tirumala and the frenzy festival fervor of the shrine, all captured by J. Ramanan, with an appealing narration by Vrinda Ramanan.

Tell the Publisher! 
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

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If you didn’t notice, people who bought the coffee-table book on the temple town also bought 1 Kg of detergent and a book on colonial history of India, so Amazon tells us!!!

So we’re safe at least for now!

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The Power Of Stories

the-power-of-stories

Our grandma’s always knew. The power of stories to engage, influence and persuade is now being rediscovered by the business community  and its relevance in all functions of an organization. .

In his talk with former Procter & Gamble executive Paul Smith, now a speaker and trainer on storytelling techniques and author of Sell with a Story: How to Capture Attention, Build Trust, and Close the Sale, Skip Prichard got him to share his  personal experience of the power of a sales story.

An extract from a transcript available here (Skip’s blog on Leadership Insights):

Last summer my wife, Lisa, and I were at an art show in Cincinnati. She was on a mission to find a piece for our boys’ bathroom wall at home.

At one point we found ourselves at the booth of an underwater photographer named Chris Gug. Looking through his work, Lisa got attached to a picture that, to me, looked about as out of place as a pig in the ocean. It was a picture of a pig in the ocean! Literally. A cute little baby piglet, up to its nostrils in salt water, snout covered with sand, dog-paddling its way straight into the camera lens.

When I got my chance, I asked the seller (named Gug) what on Earth that pig was doing in the ocean. And that’s when the magic started.

He said, “Yeah, it was the craziest thing. That picture was taken in the Caribbean, just off the beach of an uninhabited Bahamian island named Big Major Cay.” He told us that years ago, a local entrepreneur brought a drove of pigs to the island to raise for bacon.

Then he said, “But, as you can see in the picture, there’s not much more than cactus on the island for them to eat. And pigs don’t much like cactus. So the pigs weren’t doing very well. But at some point, a restaurant owner on a nearby island started bringing his kitchen refuse by boat over to Big Major Cay and dumping it a few dozen yards off shore. The hungry pigs eventually learned to swim to get to the food. Each generation of pigs followed suit, and now all the pigs on the island can swim. As a result, today the island is more commonly known as Pig Island.”

Gug went on to describe how the pigs learned that approaching boats meant food, so they eagerly swim up to anyone arriving by boat. And that’s what allowed him to more easily get the close-up shot of the dog-paddling piglet. He probably didn’t even have to get out of his boat.

I handed him my credit card and said, “We’ll take it!”

Why my change of heart? The moment before he shared his story (to me at least), the photo was just a picture of a pig in the ocean, worth little more than the paper it was printed on. But two minutes later, it was no longer just a picture. It was a story—a story I would be reminded of every time I looked at it. The story turned the picture into a conversation piece—a unique combination of geography lesson, history lesson, and animal psychology lesson all in one.

In the two minutes it took Gug to tell us that story, the value of that picture increased immensely. It’s the kind of story that I now refer to as a “value-adding” story because it literally makes what you’re selling more valuable to the buyer.

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Hate Selling

Tom Fisfburne, a career marketer, a coach and a consultant has a lot of interesting things to say on his subject. Excerpted from his blog post here.

hate-selling

Rafat Ali of Skift described how travel brands market to customers as “hate-selling”:

“Delta’s lowest fare seats comes with tons of restrictions, and its ecommerce team thought it would be a great idea to hate-sell it,  implying: “Here’s is what you don’t get, you cheap shit!” Passive-aggressive selling at its best. Or worst.”

hate-selling-2
…”

The post attracted an interesting comment from a reader seeing nothing wrong though…:

Steve Willson says

I’m actually pleased to see that Delta is explicitly laying out what you DON’T get if you book their lowest price fares. We so often see news reports and travel site posts after the fact with folks complaining that they didn’t know that they might not get seated with their companion, or that they didn’t get a meal. Those of us who travel a lot understand the lunacy of “modern” air travel, but those who are infrequent travellers may still be stuck in the romantic era. So maybe we just need to frame the conversation a bit differently…

“At Delta we look forward to having you onboard, but here are a few reminders before you complete your ticket purchase…”

Maybe I’m jaded, but I go for transparency whenever possible:)

End

 

 

Standing Ovation.jpg

Via: Skip Prichard’s (a coach, a trainer, a consultant…) blog here. Text in italics is added.

 

Watch out, rules are changing! Read till the end.

whatever-haappened-to-selling-we-knew-about

 

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