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Posts Tagged ‘Attrition’

A recent article in Inc dramatically reports:

‘In 1 Powerful Sentence, Mark Cuban Just Gave Every Company in America a Harsh Wake-up Call’

It’s a simple statement, with profound implications.

Mark Cuban – GETTY IMAGES

Goes on with:

Mark Cuban, Shark Tank investor and outspoken owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, recently took to his personal blog to comment on a major issue facing the NBA — and every employer in America.

There’s been a lot of talk regarding how NBA players have really taken control of their league, with the most talented players teaming up behind the scenes to play together or asking to be traded to a different team if they’re not happy with their situation.

Quotes Cuban saying:

Some feel that the player movement we have seen … is a problem, I don’t. I think it is exactly what we should expect, and it reflects what is happening in the job market across industries in our country.

“This reality has changed what it is like to be an employer. In the past, the default was that the best employees would want a long career with their employers, because that is what you did. You kept your job as long as you could. No longer.”

And then, the 1 Powerful Sentence:

“Now the onus is on employers to keep their best employees happy.”

Don’t we guys in software industry of 1980-2010 vintage know? Talk to us and we’ll tell you horror stories to fill many tomes. With attrition soaring amok, further aggravated by shortage of talent pool, it wasn’t about keeping ‘best employees’ happy. One had to amuse whoever walked by within six feet of the front gates to lure 

Welcome to the Party, America – you’re a few decades late though. Invite us to talks – we can tell a thing or two – on how we coped up, kept the show going, our customers served without disruption!

To be fair, it’s not new to them either – I recall from many years ago a senior executive from HP,  wise to our predicament, mentioning it was no different in those early years in California. May be long forgotten with its learnings.

The article goes on to talk about the How’s of the sentence, covering all bases: coaching, empowerment, inclusivity, communication, career development…besides remuneration.

Coming back to the real subject of this post, ‘1 Powerful Sentence’:

“Now the onus is on employers to keep their best employees happy.”

You thought happiness is more for pets given to by their masters?  

Sorry, am being irreverent and flippant.

Years of working with colleagues at all levels and of all hues in good and bad times has taught us one thing that I share with you here – a perspective adding to (and not in any way invalidating) the professed sentence and its How’s:

Make it a journey with them – feasible, authentic, involved, worthwhile, interesting and enjoyable for them, for you and the organization. Happiness ensues and a lot more…

To cite a parallel, of relevance – Just as caring for community’s safety and earning their respect and the adrenal rush of running towards (and not away from) danger to save life and property are identified as the two pure and strong turn-on’s in the lives of fire-fighters who in many surveys end up high to very high in job satisfaction.

Each of those words feasible…is purposeful, non-overlapping and worthy of deliberation.

Well, I can tell you – and my colleagues out there would also vouch – it has been shown to work for its practitioners.

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This extract is from an article titled above appearing in Adweek.

SandyHook.jpg

Here’s a pretty amazing ad from BBDO New York, with a mystery at its core.

At the outset, we meet Evan, a high school kid who can’t wait for summer break. He’s so bored that he begins etching words into a table in the library. The next day, he finds that someone has written back to him on the table—and there ensues a back-and-forth that’s pretty captivating. Perhaps too captivating.

There seems to be romance building, or at least the hint of it. Who’s been writing back to Evan? And will he ever connect with them?

Watch here to find out, before reading further.

It’s a completely disorienting ending, and that’s the point. As the spot shows the prior scenes once again, it’s baffling how you could have missed so much of what was on the screen.

Which is, of course, the message from the advertiser, Sandy Hook Promise, a nonpartisan nonprofit led by family members whose loved ones were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School four years ago this month.

“Through ‘Evan,’ we sought to show how different your perspective can be when you’re aware of the signs,” says Greg Hahn, chief creative officer of BBDO New York…

“When you don’t know what to look for, or can’t recognize what you are seeing, it can be easy to miss warning signs or dismiss them as unimportant. That can lead to tragic consequences,” says Nicole Hockley, co-founder and managing director of Sandy Hook Promise, who lost her first-grade son Dylan in the Sandy Hook massacre.

While the main purport of the spot is to preempt school shooters and other acts of crime and suicides averting loss of life, it is not difficult to look at it in the context of employee attrition, customer churn, etc. Here again it is a matter of reading the signals given out before it happens

I recall attending a talk years ago by a GE’s HR executive on the model they had set up at their BPO center to point out vulnerabilities in regard to employee attrition – a constant headache for BPO’s. It picked up numerous signals such as frequent leaves of absence, upcoming marriages and other events in the family, etc. etc. and was fairly successful with its output. Of course it meant one knew what one was looking for.

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Source: The original article is available here.

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Enjoyed receiving this strip below from my good friend and ex-colleague Rajanga Sivakumar:

Camel 1

Camel 2

Camel 3

Camel 4

Moral of the story:

Camel 5

So right it is.

The trouble is a right place does not come by easily. Even if it does, it may not stay right for long.

How about righting the place where you are? Before giving up, I mean. Incidentally no company raps you on the knuckles when the results show up good on account the changes you bring in.

Today, it is important to understand changes don’t/need not always flow from the top. Every employee has an opportunity to be a change agent in some ways. Of course, it needs an empowering environment. Perfectly possible in many Indian companies with loosely drawn lines and roles than in MNC’s and their offshore units with rigorously templated jobs. May be that MNC’s don’t need righting since they’re right already? Though I doubt given the dynamics of IT business and the interesting possibilities thrown up almost everyday.

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