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Employers want you to ask this question. Here’s why

A tip from J.T. O’Donnell, founder and CEO of Work It Daily, a site dedicated to helping people solve their own career problems.

(Lightly edited, interspersed with occasional amplifying comments in italics)

Anyone who has been on an interview knows there usually comes a point at the end of the meeting where the interviewer says to the interviewee, “Do you have any questions?” You may be wondering whether it’s OK to ask some. Or if you should just say, “I’m good,” so as to not take up any more of their time. Having been a hiring manager myself and working with thousands of them on a regular basis, I can tell you failing to ask questions can hurt your chances of getting the job

You can increase the chances of getting the job when you prove you can solve their problems and alleviate their pain. Therefore, the best question <in fact he recommends a longer list if situation permits> to ask in the interview is:

“What’s the company’s biggest threat to success this year, and how will I be able to help overcome it in this role?”

By asking this, you’re giving the employer the opportunity to articulate how this position (and the person it it!) can offer the biggest impact. They’re literally telling you how you can meet and exceed their expectations! Once they answer this question, you’ll then have an opportunity to respond and even share some of your past experience that relates to what they said. This is how to reinforce the fact you understand what’s important to them. This gives the hiring manager greater confidence that you’re the candidate who will do the best job… it also helps you decide if you will survive and thrive as an employee there. That’s why you should always have a list of questions ready to ask before you leave!

Don’t Forget, Interviewing Is a Two-Way Street

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Source: inc.com/jt-odonnell/managers-say-asking-this-1-question-in-a-job-interview-increases-chances-you-get-hired.html

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George Buckley

These words come in at a time when reality perceived to be very complex and no one claims to have all answers. Today organizations are said to prefer smart and empowered individuals homed in flatter structures to command-driven ‘tools’ embedded in deep hierarchies.

Reality is better served, one would think, by a middle ‘gray’ with a place, time and degree for either approaches..

Perhaps Buckley made the observation in a context that wasn’t included.

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Source: managementtoday.co.uk

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Some have all the luck!

China 1

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China 3

China 4

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Source: net

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and the sticks too.

From Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by  Daniel H. Pink via Delancey.com (lightly edited)

 “…

“Behavioral scientists often divide what we do on the job or learn in school into two categories: ‘algorithmic’ and ‘heuristic.’ An algorithmic task is one in which you follow a set of established instructions down a single pathway to one conclusion. That is, there’s an algorithm for solving it. A heuristic task is the opposite. Precisely because no algorithm exists for it, you have to experiment with possibilities and devise a novel solution. Working as a grocery checkout clerk is mostly algorithmic. You do pretty much the same thing over and over in a certain way. Creating an ad campaign is mostly heuristic. So are designing new software, inventing new products…

“During the twentieth century, most work was algorithmic — and not just jobs where you turned the same screw the same way all day long. Even when we traded blue collars for white, the tasks we carried out were often routine. That is, we could reduce much of what we did — in accounting, law, computer programming, and other fields — to a script, a spec sheet, a formula, or a series of steps that produced a right answer. … The consulting firm McKinsey & Co. estimates that in the United States, only 30 percent of job growth now comes from algorithmic work, while 70 percent comes from heuristic work. A key reason: Routine work can be outsourced or automated; artistic, empathetic, non-routine work generally cannot.

“The implications for motivation are vast. Researchers such as Harvard Business School’s Teresa Amabile have found that external rewards and punishments — both carrots and sticks — can work nicely for algorithmic tasks. But they can be devastating for heuristic ones…

Rewards, by their very nature, narrow our focus. That’s helpful when there’s a clear path to a solution. They help us stare ahead and race faster. But ‘if-then’ motivators are terrible for [complex conceptual problems]. As experiments show, the rewards narrowed people’s focus and blinkered the wide view that might have allowed them to see new uses for old objects.”

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See here.

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pictures-339

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Source: www

 

 

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cartoon5923

 

An earlier post on the subject here. 

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