Posts Tagged ‘Interview’


An interview question I’m glad I never had to face:

Solve 31x+30y+29z=366 where variables x, y and z are non-zero integers.

There are no other equations given to you that x, y and z satisfy.

How much time you get? Well, you know, guys are quite impatient on the other side of the table. Needless to add no computing devices may be accessed.

Get going, all the best!

When you see the solution here in the ‘Comments’ you’re going to make the leap of the year out of your chair and kick yourself!

Hint? It’s already in there!




Source: Quora and image from LinkedIn




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Employers want you to ask this question. Here’s why

A tip from J.T. O’Donnell, founder and CEO of Work It Daily, a site dedicated to helping people solve their own career problems.

(Lightly edited, interspersed with occasional amplifying comments in italics)

Anyone who has been on an interview knows there usually comes a point at the end of the meeting where the interviewer says to the interviewee, “Do you have any questions?” You may be wondering whether it’s OK to ask some. Or if you should just say, “I’m good,” so as to not take up any more of their time. Having been a hiring manager myself and working with thousands of them on a regular basis, I can tell you failing to ask questions can hurt your chances of getting the job

You can increase the chances of getting the job when you prove you can solve their problems and alleviate their pain. Therefore, the best question <in fact he recommends a longer list if situation permits> to ask in the interview is:

“What’s the company’s biggest threat to success this year, and how will I be able to help overcome it in this role?”

By asking this, you’re giving the employer the opportunity to articulate how this position (and the person it it!) can offer the biggest impact. They’re literally telling you how you can meet and exceed their expectations! Once they answer this question, you’ll then have an opportunity to respond and even share some of your past experience that relates to what they said. This is how to reinforce the fact you understand what’s important to them. This gives the hiring manager greater confidence that you’re the candidate who will do the best job… it also helps you decide if you will survive and thrive as an employee there. That’s why you should always have a list of questions ready to ask before you leave!

Don’t Forget, Interviewing Is a Two-Way Street



Source: inc.com/jt-odonnell/managers-say-asking-this-1-question-in-a-job-interview-increases-chances-you-get-hired.html

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Who needs a job, here?

Years ago, after passing out of Indian Institute of Technology, a few of us applied for a job with a premier software consultancy firm. We felt quite apprehensive about getting slotted into a Cobol coding job as it had happened in the past with most of our seniors from the Institute. We were too naive to see it as an opportunity to learn about the interesting world of core business processes and transactions, not taught in the class rooms. In the personal interview that followed, I brought myself up to asking for a job that involved both hardware and software (writing device drivers, etc.). The interviwer nicely explained how they did not have positions of that kind, at least at that time. Thus I blew my chances of starting my career with that organization.

The simple but important take-away for me was ‘never ever bid for a position that does not exist in an organization’. No one is going to create one at least in the lower echleons of the corporate hierarchy. And don’t ever confuse the interviewer by bringing up an ‘undefined’ option of any kind!

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