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Posts Tagged ‘Process’

James Lather in his blog carries this interesting story about an internal memo from Howard Schultz on ‘The Commoditization of the Starbucks Experience’. Though dated, is very much relevant even today. Read on:

From: Howard Schultz
Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2007 10:39 AM Pacific Standard Time
To: Jim Donald
Cc: Anne Saunders; Dave Pace; Dorothy Kim; Gerry Lopez; Jim Alling; Ken Lombard; Martin Coles; Michael Casey; Michelle Gass; Paula Boggs; Sandra Taylor

Subject: The Commoditization of the Starbucks Experience

As you prepare for the FY 08 strategic planning process, I want to share some of my thoughts with you.

Over the past ten years, in order to achieve the growth, development, and scale necessary to go from less than 1,000 stores to 13,000 stores and beyond, we have had to make a series of decisions that, in retrospect, have lead to the watering down of the Starbucks experience, and, what some might call the commoditization of our brand.

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Many of these decisions were probably right at the time, and on their own merit would not have created the dilution of the experience; but in this case, the sum is much greater and, unfortunately, much more damaging than the individual pieces. For example, when we went to automatic espresso machines, we solved a major problem in terms of speed of service and efficiency. At the same time, we overlooked the fact that we would remove much of the romance and theatre that was in play with the use of the La Marzocca machines. This specific decision became even more damaging when the height of the machines, which are now in thousands of stores, blocked the visual sight line the customer previously had to watch the drink being made, and for the intimate experience with the barista. This, coupled with the need for fresh roasted coffee in every North America city and every international market, moved us toward the decision and the need for flavor locked packaging. Again, the right decision at the right time, and once again I believe we overlooked the cause and the affect of flavor lock in our stores. We achieved fresh roasted bagged coffee, but at what cost? The loss of aroma — perhaps the most powerful non-verbal signal we had in our stores; the loss of our people scooping fresh coffee from the bins and grinding it fresh in front of the customer, and once again stripping the store of tradition and our heritage? Then we moved to store design. Clearly we have had to streamline store design to gain efficiencies of scale and to make sure we had the ROI on sales to investment ratios that would satisfy the financial side of our business. However, one of the results has been stores that no longer have the soul of the past and reflect a chain of stores vs. the warm feeling of a neighborhood store. Some people even call our stores sterile, cookie cutter, no longer reflecting the passion our partners feel about our coffee. In fact, I am not sure people today even know we are roasting coffee. You certainly can’t get the message from being in our stores. The merchandise, more art than science, is far removed from being the merchant that I believe we can be and certainly at a minimum should support the foundation of our coffee heritage. Some stores don’t have coffee grinders, French presses from Bodum, or even coffee filters.

Now that I have provided you with a list of some of the underlying issues that I believe we need to solve, let me say at the outset that we have all been part of these decisions. I take full responsibility myself, but we desperately need to look into the mirror and realize it’s time to get back to the core and make the changes necessary to evoke the heritage, the tradition, and the passion that we all have for the true Starbucks experience. While the current state of affairs for the most part is self induced, that has lead to competitors of all kinds, small and large coffee companies, fast food operators, and mom and pops, to position themselves in a way that creates awareness, trial and loyalty of people who previously have been Starbucks customers. This must be eradicated.

I have said for 20 years that our success is not an entitlement and now it’s proving to be a reality. Let’s be smarter about how we are spending our time, money and resources. Let’s get back to the core. Push for innovation and do the things necessary to once again differentiate Starbucks from all others. We source and buy the highest quality coffee. We have built the most trusted brand in coffee in the world, and we have an enormous responsibility to both the people who have come before us and the 150,000 partners and their families who are relying on our stewardship.

Finally, I would like to acknowledge all that you do for Starbucks. Without your passion and commitment, we would not be where we are today…

James observes this memo is interesting for two reasons:

1.It shows the problem with ill-conceived process improvement that fixed an internal metric and did not benefit the customer.

2.It is all about management integrity. The CEO is a brave man who, when he sees a mistake, takes full responsibility for it and does a U-turn to solve the problem.

My two cents: A process improvement that fixes an internal metric is not such a sin as made out to be. In fact it is sorely needed with the back-office processes. But when it intersects in any way with user’s experience – the memo provides with many concrete examples in this case – one needs to look at it with much greater care and caution. The points of intersection may not be obvious at the first glance.

End

Source: ft.com/cms/s/0/dc 5099ac-c391-11db-9047-000b5df10621.html#axzz3o8YnDFyr and James Lather’s blog at squawkpoint.com. Image is from flickr.com.

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Recently I learnt about an alarming situation regarding a system rolled out in a utility service for rendering emergency help to public users. It is quite imaginable that similar conditions may be prevailing in number of other towns in various utility operations.

 

It appears that these systems are not developed centrally under controlled processes as one would have thought, but more as local initiatives. And these are developed with the help of freelancers or part-time professionals and not with employees on rolls. This is understandable for reasons of skills shortage and also costs involved. And dealing with an individual developer is a lot easier than dealing with a service provider company especially for carrying out changes. In this mode of development, the changes, more often than not, are occasioned by requirements originally missed out due to lax ways of specifying rather than requirements evolving over usage. So it is not unusual to see a spate of changes lined up soon after the roll-out.

 

The code rolled out in the production server does not match with the code on the development server. Perhaps some code pieces are lying somewhere on the development server not easily traceable, or they are lost, or some changes were made directly on the production server. The seriousness of the situation has not sunk in yet. The ability to maintain and enhance the software is seriously compromised. For those of us who have been in this business long enough, this is not unusual. But what is scary is these are public-facing applications rolled out in the field, whose malfunction could cause personal injury or, worse, loss of life.

 

Further, there is no concept of version control or a sand-box for thorough testing before roll-out. It is not known if the system is piloted first before the full roll-out to iron out wrinkles.

 

As if this is not enough, I understood the freelancer has gone away for reasons not known. May be it was a cost cutting measure or the freelancer hiked his fees or he had to put distance between himself and the mess that was created (may not be entirely his doing). Needless to say there has been no formal hand-over process. When even the live-code inventory is incomplete, code or system documentation is too much to ask.

 

Into this scenario, the freelancer’s replacement walks in. Can you imagine his/her plight? And, there is a pile of pending enhancement requests waiting for him/her to take up right away. What it takes to maintain software is not always appreciated. What is at stake is not the individual’s performance, but safety of public users for whom the system is in operation.

 

Since public safety is involved, it is important that some minimal norms are enforced for developing and subsequently maintaining these systems and, the compliance to these norms are audited from time to time. May be these norms and audits are already an established practice in some  geographies.

 

This is not a call against freelancers who deliver great value, flexibility and responsiveness (and skills too) required by users whose requirement for software development is light and sporadic. It is a call for controlled processes for developing software especially for moderate-to-high impact applications.

 

Processes must be recognized as a mandatory piece of any scenario wherein software is developed or used for a serious application. The processes are not meant only for the developers; importantly, they also discipline the users (not the end-using public) who commission the developers and whose laxity is also often the root cause of the ensuing mess. It follows that both the developers and the users must be educated on the processes to be followed.

 

Of course, the processes must be right-sized to suit the customer and the application. Else, they could enormously slow down the software development efforts. Admittedly, right-sizing processes may not be a trivial exercise. Further, it is not required to induct a full set of processes which could be quite intimidating for a light-load user. It is sufficient to implement some key processes at a level of simplicity that serves the purpose. 

 

This could be done with some minimal professional help. May be there are sources from which it is possible to buy right-sized processes; and, get the freelancers to follow them.

 

On part of the software service providers, there is money on the table for those who come up with innovative models to develop and service systems for these light-load customers at affordable TCO without compromising on the norms. 

 

Of course, an off-the-shelf package solution significantly mitigates the risks and must be strongly considered as a solution over custom development.

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