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Posts Tagged ‘Projects’

I was camping in a fairly large house, well maintained, surrounded by a number of flowering trees and plants, home to countless birds that treated us to a melodious cacophony announcing their morning foray and home coming in the evening. It was time for the trees to renew themselves – service staff came in the morning and again in the afternoon to sweep off the leaves copiously shed by the tress on the front-yard.  The flowering plants however were still abloom. At times on my touch, a bee would startle me flying out from deep inside the flower.

For one who has lived all his life in Mumbai flats (apartments) where one cannot take ten steps without hitting a wall, one’s auditory nerves constantly assaulted by caw’s of those sullen crows and bark of stray (and house) dogs, this was an overwhelming experience. The spacious front-yard was where I took my mandatory morning and evening walks, my senses enjoying the sights and sounds around.

Get the picture?

The only blot on the scene was the rubble piled up near the neem tree at one corner of the house in the front.  The house owner had not cleared it intending to reuse it in future possibly for patching up parts of the yard.

Yesterday morning, walking near the neem tree I saw a splash of red dried up on the debris. I had not seen it before. Clearly, someone, possibly one of those tradesmen called in for some repair work, had used it as a spittoon after chewing a paan (betel leaf + lime + arca nut shavings + whatever). Unfortunate, but true, in this country one may freely spit in public or even common spaces, but never so within a house. But the perpetrator saw it differently – if the corner was good (?) to pile up the rubble, no one minding, it was ok for him to spit over there.

The ‘Broken Window’ syndrome playing out!

Broken_windows,_Northampton_State_Hospital

From wiki: ‘Under the broken windows theory, an ordered and clean environment, one that is maintained, sends the signal that the area is monitored and that criminal behavior is not tolerated. Conversely, a disordered environment, one that is not maintained (broken windows, graffiti, excessive litter), sends the signal that the area is not monitored and that criminal behavior has little risk of detection.’

A few broken windows, at times even one, left unfixed for some time is a trigger or invitation for many more, if not all, to be broken.

Much is written on this syndrome as a subject of study under criminology and urban sociology.

Outside of crime, the phenomenon may be observed in many other contexts: projects, product development, organizations, communities and even in personal life.

When a project manager leaves unfixed the first infractions on time deadline, quality issues or team indiscipline…, the first window is broken. His team reads it differently. It’s very likely he would, to his grief, witness many more ‘broken windows’ before long on his way down and out.

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Source: wikipedia

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A short post from Valeria Maltoni at conversationagent.com draws attention to a paper about health services reforms needed in Canada  wherein Dr. Sholom Glouberman and Dr. Brenda Zimmerman address how problems should be looked at.

The authors in their paper identify problems under three types: a) Simple b) Complicated and c) Complex. These are explained using this table:

Problem Types

The paper shows, in a real-life application in the healthcare domain, how the vicious cycle of ever-resource-hungry ER services – a sore point with many countries in the west – may be transformed into a virtuous cycle of providing needed services. All it calls for is a right perspective, regarding it as a complex problem and adopting an appropriate approach for this class of problems in seeking solutions.

A number of examples are cited to show how a wrong perspective of the problem – often one is seduced by prior experience to regard a truly complex problem as a complicated one amenable to our learned methods – leads to incorrect approaches resulting in undesired outcomes.

An amazing paper, I think, that forces us to relook at how we have been handling many seemingly intractable personal/professional/societal problems with little or mixed success.

Their paper has wide applicability far beyond its subject of medicare in Canada (dated 2013). Is accessible at:  http://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/CP32-79-8-2002E.pdf

And Valeria Maltoni’ insightful blog on a variety of topics backed by her enormous experience in the creative execution of integrated marketing and communication programs is available at: http://conversationagent.com

Happy reading!

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