Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Quality’

vide Subramanian Krishnamurthy and Ranganathan Narasimhan

End

Read Full Post »

HTB1_WVlXlxRMKJjy0Fdq6yifFXas

Read Full Post »

An interesting story from James Lawther:

…During the second world war over 60 million people were killed.  That was roughly 3% of the world-wide population.  It was a hazardous time.

Among the hardest hit were the bomber crews.  The Eighth Air Force suffered half of all the U.S. Air Force’s casualties.  The British fared as badly.  The chances of surviving the war as a member of the RAF’s bomber command were only marginally better than even.

If flying bombing raids wasn’t dangerous enough, landing when you returned home was also fraught with danger.  Pilots of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress had a series of runway crashes, accidentally retracting the landing gear when they touched down.

…Accident investigators blamed these incidents on pilot (or human) error.  There was no obvious mechanical failure.

It wasn’t only Flying Fortresses that had the problem.  There were stories of pilots of P-17 Thunderbolts and B-25 Mitchells making the same mistake.

Nobody would deliberately retract the landing gear when they were still hurtling across the tarmac.  Why the pilots did so was anybody’s guess.  Perhaps the pilot’s attention wandered when they realized they were almost home.

…The authorities asked Alphonse Chapanis,  a military psychologist to explain the behavior.  He noticed that the accidents only happened to certain planes and not others.  There were thousands of C-47 transport planes buzzing about.  Their pilots never suffered from such fatal inattention.

After inspecting the cockpits of the different planes the cause became clear.  On B-17s the controls for the flaps and undercarriage were next to one another.  They also had the same style of handle.   Pilots who retracted the undercarriage when the wheels were on the ground were actually trying to retract the flaps. They just pulled the wrong lever.

In the C-47 the two controls were very different and positioned apart from each other.

The solution: Once he identified the cause Chapanis developed an equally simple solution.  Circular rubber disks were stuck to the levers for the undercarriage and triangles were stuck to the levers for the flaps.  When a pilot touched the rubber, he felt the difference and the crashes stopped…The pilots were well aware of which lever to pull.  It was “human error” that caused the mistake.  But laying the blame on the pilots wasn’t ever going to solve that.

14268987360_480684fa56_o-400x320

We all make mistakes.  It is in our nature.  Don’t fight it, fix it.

 

End

 

The original post – unfortunately no way to reblog – may be read here.

Read Full Post »

I was camping in a fairly large house, well maintained, surrounded by a number of flowering trees and plants, home to countless birds that treated us to a melodious cacophony announcing their morning foray and home coming in the evening. It was time for the trees to renew themselves – service staff came in the morning and again in the afternoon to sweep off the leaves copiously shed by the tress on the front-yard.  The flowering plants however were still abloom. At times on my touch, a bee would startle me flying out from deep inside the flower.

For one who has lived all his life in Mumbai flats (apartments) where one cannot take ten steps without hitting a wall, one’s auditory nerves constantly assaulted by caw’s of those sullen crows and bark of stray (and house) dogs, this was an overwhelming experience. The spacious front-yard was where I took my mandatory morning and evening walks, my senses enjoying the sights and sounds around.

Get the picture?

The only blot on the scene was the rubble piled up near the neem tree at one corner of the house in the front.  The house owner had not cleared it intending to reuse it in future possibly for patching up parts of the yard.

Yesterday morning, walking near the neem tree I saw a splash of red dried up on the debris. I had not seen it before. Clearly, someone, possibly one of those tradesmen called in for some repair work, had used it as a spittoon after chewing a paan (betel leaf + lime + arca nut shavings + whatever). Unfortunate, but true, in this country one may freely spit in public or even common spaces, but never so within a house. But the perpetrator saw it differently – if the corner was good (?) to pile up the rubble, no one minding, it was ok for him to spit over there.

The ‘Broken Window’ syndrome playing out!

Broken_windows,_Northampton_State_Hospital

From wiki: ‘Under the broken windows theory, an ordered and clean environment, one that is maintained, sends the signal that the area is monitored and that criminal behavior is not tolerated. Conversely, a disordered environment, one that is not maintained (broken windows, graffiti, excessive litter), sends the signal that the area is not monitored and that criminal behavior has little risk of detection.’

A few broken windows, at times even one, left unfixed for some time is a trigger or invitation for many more, if not all, to be broken.

Much is written on this syndrome as a subject of study under criminology and urban sociology.

Outside of crime, the phenomenon may be observed in many other contexts: projects, product development, organizations, communities and even in personal life.

When a project manager leaves unfixed the first infractions on time deadline, quality issues or team indiscipline…, the first window is broken. His team reads it differently. It’s very likely he would, to his grief, witness many more ‘broken windows’ before long on his way down and out.

End

 

Source: wikipedia

Read Full Post »

paul-heckel_MrxmZW4Jh.jpg

End

Read Full Post »

 

Outside a hospital:

600400_10207514006700929_5639004389195404671_n

This security guard’s duty is to instruct people to remove their shoes.

Why he was arranging shoes in the rack?

“Sir, this seat is my office and I want to sit in neat office.”

He also greets worried visitors with a reassuring ‘Everything will be fine, your patients will soon go home with you.’

In all likelihood he would not have had the benefit of any level of schooling.

End

 

Source: Adopted from facebook.com/groups/101024580247213/ posted by Gautham Iyengar (here)

Read Full Post »

Rfc1394_Wheelchair

Last week, we had been away to a resort off Lonavala for a short break of four days, taking along a reluctant 85+ year old lady – my mom – kicking and screaming. Every morning and evening, I took her out in a wheel-chair thankfully made available by the resort to give her a much needed outing. The wheel-chair ride was the first for both of us.

I am not aware if there are norms for the ramps meant for steering wheel-chairs up or down. In this instance, the wheel-chair often dashed down the ramp almost uncontrollably pulled by her weight and the steepness of the slope. At least on a couple of occasions she came close to being thrown out of her seat. Clearly the need was for seat belts to secure the occupant safely. Also brakes would have helped start/stop the wheel-chair when needed, just like the brakes on the baggage trolleys at the airport.

The wheel-chair had a pair of foot-rests that swung into place from the sides for use. These all-metal foot-rests had sharp edges that caused abrasions on the feet when the old lady struggled to get her feet into position.

A convenience feature I would have liked to see is a pair of height-adjustable handles to push the chair instead of me half-bending down.

It is quite possible the wheel-chair I used was old and primitive and the newer models provide these safety and engineering features.

Incidentally I’m not ashamed to confess: Only after messing it up a couple of times, I found out it was much easier to seat her in by positioning the wheel-chair to where she was standing rather than other way around. Did you say common-sense? Well…

End .
.
Credits: openclipart (Rfc1394_Wheelchair)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »