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Posts Tagged ‘Requirements’

Finally a product no one would sniff at:

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New Hatton Garden heist image

During a bank heist the Chief told the Sergeant to cover all exits so the robbers could not get away.

Later the Sergeant reports to the chief.

“Sorry sir but they got away.”

The chief very disappointed says, “I told you to cover all exits!”

“I did” replied the Sergeant. “but they got away through the entrance.”

That was in jest.

But in real it is not very different IT/Services sectors.

How often we tell our customers: “Mr. Customer, you never brought this up all this time and now…”

I’m reminded of an incident where a CFO kept on asking for more reports. The PM (Project Manager) in sheer disgust got his manager to rein him in: After the polite handshakes, the manager brought up the issue. He assured the CFO they were not reluctant to give him what he wants. But these would be regarded as chargeable change requests.

The CFO in even tone drew the manager’s attention to a line in the Work-Order.

It said “Account-Receivables”.

“You had claimed you’ve rolled it out at a number of other sites. And dont you know AR implies all these reports?”

End of discussion on scope creep.

When we unleash an untrained/inexperienced business analyst on our customer – these days many a youngster aspires to become one (business analyst, I mean) – he fails to see beyond what the customer says literally. And the customer goes away with the comforting thought the analyst has understood him in whole. The analyst may be likened to the stenographers of yester years operating strictly in the what-you-said-is-what-you-get mode – a great disservice to our customer.

An interesting aside: The image appearing above is one officailly released of the laocker room in the New Hatton Garden heist.  The burglars, it is beileved, first entered at about 9.20pm on 2 April and stayed until 8.05am the next morning, Good Friday. An alarm went off at 12.21am on 3 April, about three hours after the gang entered the vault area, according to timings released by police. The gang returned to the vault on Saturday 4 April at about 10.17pm, staying until 6.30am the next morning. Key staff were off work because of the Easter holiday and police were alerted to the burglary just after 8am on Tuesday 7 April. The alarm was recorded and transferred to the police’s computer-aided dispatch system. “A grade was applied to the call that meant that no police response was deemed to be required,” the statement released by the police said. “An internal investigation is ongoing to identify why this grade was applied to the call in conjunction with the alarm company.”

The final disposition of the investigation is not known. Am sure an interesting story is waiting to be unravelled.

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Credits: ajokeaday.com and press for the info on the heist.

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W(h)ither OOAD?

These days many software development projects are executed using agile model.

To be efficient, agile programming requires agile design.

And fortunately OOAD by first principles is agile. Example: I can begin modeling an organization even before I know about the various divisions of the organization. I can always extend the design as I become progressively aware of the divisions.

This ability to see ’one in many’ abstraction requires a certain line of thinking, by no means, common.

Recently I was reviewing a design – the application is around a spatial assembly of a number of entities. And each entity occurred in many variations.

Neither the Requirements nor the Design made any serious attempt to seek out the commonalities across the variations of each entity – kind of flat and unfolded. The team was ready to modularly code in a very straight-forward manner every variation as and when it was encountered.

On the downside, this approach means a design sure to offend the purists, less reuse and more effort in coding, testing and fixing. On the plus side no great skills of abstraction are required and the coding is also rather simple and fast. Given the all-round shortage of skills, this approach cannot be despised altogether?

A new trick the old dog must learn? Leaves me a little unsure of what I’m standing for.

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