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The Asian Entrepreneur

Competence and wisdom of a source of information, instruction or inspiration, be it a book, a teacher, a consultant or the net, can show a simpler and surer way out or mire one in unending complexity.

Here’s a metaphorical illustration from Ray’s Daily:

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The new family in the neighborhood overslept and the six year old daughter missed her school bus.

The father, though late for work, agreed to drive her if she’d direct him to the school. They rode several blocks before she told him to turn the first time, several more before she indicated another turn.  This went on for 20 minutes — yet when they finally reached the school, it proved to be only a short distance from their home.

Asked why she’d led the father over such a circuitous route, the child explained, “That’s the way the school bus goes, and it’s the only way I know.”

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Source: image from asianentrepreneur.org

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tears

I once read a story about a kid R who loved to write fiction. In his home lived a kid P staying with her mother employed in that home as a household help.

R once received an email from his uncle praising him for latest piece. The excited kid read out the email to P, “My uncle quite liked my story. He wrote ‘Bravo!'”

P: “Well, of course if he liked it, must be a good one. What’s the story about?”

R: “It’s about a man who finds a magic cup. Soon he learns if he weeps into the cup, his tears would turn to pearls….And at the end of story, he’s sitting on a mountain of pearls with a blood stained knife in his hands and his dead wife by his side. ”

P: “So he killed her so that he could cry more and get rich?”

R: “Yes, you’re very quick”

P: “But why couldn’t he just smell and cut some onions?”

 

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Source: quora.com/profile/Bhaskar-Dutta-15, image from independent.co.uk

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A short post from Valeria Maltoni at conversationagent.com draws attention to a paper about health services reforms needed in Canada  wherein Dr. Sholom Glouberman and Dr. Brenda Zimmerman address how problems should be looked at.

The authors in their paper identify problems under three types: a) Simple b) Complicated and c) Complex. These are explained using this table:

Problem Types

The paper shows, in a real-life application in the healthcare domain, how the vicious cycle of ever-resource-hungry ER services – a sore point with many countries in the west – may be transformed into a virtuous cycle of providing needed services. All it calls for is a right perspective, regarding it as a complex problem and adopting an appropriate approach for this class of problems in seeking solutions.

A number of examples are cited to show how a wrong perspective of the problem – often one is seduced by prior experience to regard a truly complex problem as a complicated one amenable to our learned methods – leads to incorrect approaches resulting in undesired outcomes.

An amazing paper, I think, that forces us to relook at how we have been handling many seemingly intractable personal/professional/societal problems with little or mixed success.

Their paper has wide applicability far beyond its subject of medicare in Canada (dated 2013). Is accessible at:  http://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/CP32-79-8-2002E.pdf

And Valeria Maltoni’ insightful blog on a variety of topics backed by her enormous experience in the creative execution of integrated marketing and communication programs is available at: http://conversationagent.com

Happy reading!

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